Support the government’s family law inquiry

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Bring it on, Prime Minister.  When ScoMo was campaigning in the last election, he promised to stand up for the Quiet Australians whose voices are often silenced by noisy minority groups. Last week, with the announcement of a new parliamentary inquiry into our Family Court, he invited that silent majority to be well and truly heard. Boy, are the feminists fuming.

I’ve been doing various media interviews about this. Here’s one from Perth radio 6PR

He’s attracted their wrath by setting terms of reference for this inquiry which echo widespread community concerns about pronounced anti-male bias in the family court system, particularly regarding false accusations of violence being used to give women an unfair advantage in court battles. A woman requires no evidence that violence has actually occurred to obtain a violence order and remove her partner from their home, denying him contact with his children. Her allegation that she fears violence could occur is sufficient, or her claim that she’s been emotionally, psychologically or financially abused.

A few months ago I was contacted by a retired chief inspector of police who wanted to speak out about the outrageous racket that has developed around these false violence accusations, with police required to “believe the victim” and turf men out of their homes, men they know are most likely innocent. I made a YouTube video in which he described the growing disquiet amongst the police and magistrates required to administer a system based on lies and bent on destroying men. I think we should circulate this widely to lend support to the need for this inquiry.

So now the government is asking for submissions regarding the granting of these domestic violence orders and their impact on court decisions and related questions of perjury in evidence to the court and the failure of the court to enforce their orders. The enforcement issue is particularly important given everyone knows the court allows women to constantly flaunt orders requiring them to allow fathers time with their children.

To set the cat amongst the pigeons, the government appointed Pauline Hanson, as Deputy Chair of the inquiry, a woman who has been speaking out for decades about anti-male bias in the court. The day the decision was announced Hanson gave interviews about women lying about domestic violence and men being driven to suicide through such tactics. She’s certainly right on that front. I made another video recently highlighting research evidence that the major cause of male suicide in this country is relationship breakup.

It’s been very entertaining watching the feminists go into total meltdown, using their influence on our mainstream media to parade a stream of people who claimed it was outrageous to suggest women ever lie about domestic violence – including the 86 year old Elizabeth Evatt, the first ever  Family Court judge. After Hanson mentioned her own son faced false violence and sexual abuse accusations, a prominent feminist put up a call for Hanson’s sons’ ex-partners to come forth and allow her to tell their stories. Talk about blatant skulduggery.

I’m urging you all to get busy and write to your members of parliament supporting the government’s action. It’s very easy for politicians to cave to the outraged feminist activists. I’m sure most Australians have personal experience with men damaged by the family court system. We all need to step up and support this rare chance of a public hearing regarding the unfair treatment of men in our courts.

I’m posting here a submission from the former WA Law Reform Commission Augusto Zimmermann which includes evidence about false allegations. This should give you some solid data to use in your letters. Here’s a simpler version you might prefer.

You might also like to read the introductory chapter of my book, #MenToo, which explains what led to my interest in family law. Over thirty years ago I was contacted by a retiring Family Court judge expressing concern about precisely these issues – which led ultimately to my involvement in various government committees seeking to address the bias in our system.

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