Madeline Ward_Prochoice

Sydney Uni Trouble-Makers

Fascinating developments regarding the action I have taken against key organisers of the Sydney University protest who tried to stop me speaking on about the fake rape crisis last month. Here’s my new video. Please help me circulate it. And don’t forget to like it and subscribe.

This one is mainly about Maddy Ward who proudly takes ownership of the event, along with fellow activist Jessica Syed. The two of them have quite a history. We were amazed to discover that last year the University of Sydney investigated Maddy Ward for her role in a protest against an anti-abortion group which had a stall on campus. She abused and harassed them and showed them her tits! This photograph of the two of them was taken on that day.

Work Dynamic, the firm which investigates such matters for the University, suggested Ward be given a semester’s suspension for misconduct. Ward claimed in a Buzzfeed article that the investigation was so stressful it triggered her depression and she failed a semester of her studies as a result. Yet the University failed to act prompting a NSW Labor MP Greg Donnelly to speak about the delay in parliament. (Contrary to Ward’s claims, Donnelly did not orchestrate the Christian lobby against her.)

The outcome was extraordinary. The University dropped the charges against Ward and has refused to release details of  their decision even to the anti-abortion complainants who took action against Ward. The University claimed the matter was  confidential.

The anti-abortion incident is only one example of endless trouble-making by Ward and Syed. They were in strife earlier this year for endorsing violence against Israeli soldiers in the form of a “martyred” female suicide bomber on the front page of the student magazine

It will be interesting to see whether Sydney University continues to protect these young women who are clearly responsible for so many breaches to university regulations. We now have submitted five long videos providing evidence of the key protesters in action.

It’s been exciting to see how many prominent people have spoken out in the last few weeks about the need for universities to protect free speech on campuses, including the Education Minister, the Attorney General, a number of Senators, a Chancellor and former Vice-Chancellor. The Australian has published two editorials and numerous media commentators have weighed in, using my case to argue that universities are failing to promote proper intellectual debate and challenging ideas.

Sydney University has refused to refund the security fee – Vice Chancellor Michael Spence claimed the security guards “acted within the protocols required of them.” How is it possible that the universities security guards are not required to ensure unruly students don’t breach universities regulations? We are following up this issue.

Yet the university has commenced their investigation into my complaint and  have asked for a list of witnesses for their lawyers to interview. They say the whole process may take months, given that the university then presents my named group of key protesters with a notice of allegation and they are then given time to respond.

I’ve recently postponed talks in UWA and ANU. It proved too difficult to make these events happen in a hurry, with universities naturally putting students hosting my talks through a long form-filling process regarding security and so on. We are making big plans for my campus tour next year, giving plenty of time for the universities to provide venues. I have the impression that a number of universities are now keen to step up and use my talks as proof of their new credentials in supporting free speech. Now that’s quite a breakthrough.

But I still need student groups across Australia willing to host events. The Liberal Club students at La Trobe and Sydney really put themselves on the map by being brave enough to be the first to host my events and are receiving great kudos as a result. Please help me find other courageous souls to push this process along.

It’s marvellous that my campus tour has prompted such a lively discussion about free speech on campus but I still have a long way to go to persuade universities to be braver about the fake rape crisis.